Korean Sauerkraut | Morsels of Life

Korean Sauerkraut

Morsels of Life - Korean Sauerkraut - A Korean-inspired sauerkraut brings together the traditional flavors without being overly spicy.

We recently got a head of cabbage, and I wasn't sure what I wanted to do with it. Then James mentioned he thought some sauerkraut would be good, but I didn't want to risk making a whole cabbage's worth of sauerkraut only to not have it turn out since I remembered the last time I did, and we ended up discarding most of the batch. So I thought maybe I could make a few different batches. As luck would have it, I was also reading through Nourishing Traditions, and they have four sauerkraut recipes! I figured if I made 4 different batches, at least one would turn out, right? Plus, if they didn't, at least we wouldn't have to eat too much before moving onto the next flavor. I'll share these four sauerkraut recipes (regular, Latin American, Korean, Japanese) with you over the next weeks.

This time, we're making another sauerkraut with an international flair. This Korean-inspired sauerkraut captures the spirit of kim chi without being overly spicy. (Although you could easily add chili pepper flakes if you're so inclined.) :) Often, when eating a Korean-style meal, you'll have one main dish, and a plethora of sides, the most common being kim chi. This Korean sauerkraut doesn't taste exactly like kim chi, but it definitely gets the idea across!

Do you prefer your food spicy or mild?


Morsels of Life - Korean Sauerkraut - A Korean-inspired sauerkraut brings together the traditional flavors without being overly spicy.

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A Korean-inspired sauerkraut brings together the traditional flavors without being overly spicy.

Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Yield: 1/2 quart

Materials:

Mass Weight Volume Number Material Notes
294 grams 10.375 ounces 1/4 cabbage, shredded
104 grams 3.75 ounces 1/4 cup carrots, grated
1 teaspoon ginger, grated
1 teaspoon 1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon chili pepper flakes
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon whey I strained some from my kefir. You could also strain it from yogurt. Just make sure it's got some cultures in it! :) Or if you prefer not to use whey, you could increase the amount of salt.
12 grams 0.375 ounces green onions, sliced


Methods:

Morsels of Life - Korean Sauerkraut Step 1 - Gather all materials. 1. Gather all materials.
Morsels of Life - Korean Sauerkraut Step 2 - Combine all materials and mix together. 2. Combine all materials and mix together.
Morsels of Life - Korean Sauerkraut Step 3 - Place mixture into a jar, and press/beat down until liquid covers all solids. 3. Place mixture into a jar, and press/beat down until liquid covers all solids.
Morsels of Life - Korean Sauerkraut Step 4 - (Optional - Place a layer of plastic film on top to decrease exposure to oxygen. I like to use this layer of plastic film to slow evaporation and decrease air exposure, but as long as the sauerkraut is covered in liquid, you should be fine.) Allow to ferment at room temperature, tasting the sauerkraut to determine if it has fermented enough. Once fermented to your taste, store refrigerated. 4. (Optional - Place a layer of plastic film on top to decrease exposure to oxygen. I like to use this layer of plastic film to slow evaporation and decrease air exposure, but as long as the sauerkraut is covered in liquid, you should be fine.) Allow to ferment at room temperature, tasting the sauerkraut to determine if it has fermented enough. Once fermented to your taste, store refrigerated.

Morsels of Life - Korean Sauerkraut - A Korean-inspired sauerkraut brings together the traditional flavors without being overly spicy.

Shared with: Delicious Dishes, Wonderful Wednesday, Waste Less Wednesday, What's Cookin' Wednesday, Wednesday Showcase, Creative Ways, Pinworthy Projects, What's For Dinner? Sunday, Happiness is Homemade, Nifty Thrifty Sunday, Sustainable Sunday, Melt in Your Mouth Monday, What'd You Do This Weekend?, Turn It Up Tuesday

8 comments:

  1. Looks tasty! I like the fresh combination of ingredients!

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  2. We thought it tasted like kim chi, minus the heat. Give it a try if you like kim chi. :)

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  3. I have made Polish Kraut but never Korean. I have to give this a try! Have a great week.

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    1. Let me know what you think! Polish Kraut sounds interesting too. :)

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  4. I don't think I've made saurkraut with ginger. I bet that is delicious! Thanks for posting on the #WasteLessWednesday blog hop! Can't wait to see what you post next week!

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    1. The ginger definitely added some excellent flavor! Thanks for stopping by. :)

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  5. sort of like kimchee - and I love kimchee! Thanks for sharing on the What's for Dinner Link up!

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    1. It is kinda like kim chi - almost like kim chi made from cabbage instead of napa. :) Hope you enjoy!

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